I don’t know what I’m doing wrong. Although it’s more of a marketing position, I write content two days a week for a financial advisor, but it isn’t enough to pay the bills. Maybe it’s just the area I live in but I can’t land a writing gig to save my life. And writing is a real passion of mine so it’s very frustrating. I’ll try and apply some of your tips and advice. And I feel like no matter how many emails and resumes I send out, I rarely get a reply.
Hi Elna! Thoroughly enjoyed this delightful, informative article. I am a full time paralegal with a B.A. in Journalism. I’m about 5 years away from retirement…and would like to shift from full time paralegal work to freelance writing. I’ve been writing a column (“Throwback Thursday”) in the local paper for a year now, for free, but of course I get the bylines from those which is how I’ve built my portfolio. How would you reccomend I transition to freelancing. I’m interested in writing about legal topics for lay people…such as how to find a good attorney…and small community life…and parenting.
Another level of generalists are SEO copywriters. At a minimum, SEO copywriters know how to integrate target keywords and phrases into web copy to maximize organic search benefit and avoid penalties. Some can even keyword research (if scoped in the project). Naturally, SEO copywriters are exactly the writers you need when you want to create content to help your website rank better organically in search results to get you more traffic.
A few other things I plan to try: 1) buying cheap advertising in some niche publications where writing services aren’t usually advertised but the need is high; 2) adding an online content store to my author’s website I’m developing, so I can sell ready-made content directly to clients (kind of like Constant Content but without the middle man); and 3) pitching to website developers who might want to offer content services as a package deal to their clients. I have no idea if any of these strategies will work, but it’s always better to do something than nothing, right?
Great list on content writing. I don’t know how many times I have seen websites with content that has clearly not been proofread. Silly mistakes that either make it look like it was written by someone with English as their second or third language, or they have just published their rough draft of ideas. A bit of care goes a long way to keep readers on the page ensuring they actually make it to the final call to action.
Thank you for this informative blog. This indeed enlightened a writer like me to be extra cautious as to what sites to visit. I have been writing as freelancer for barely a year now. Lately, I have been hired by a private client through a website not included in the ones you have mentioned. In just 5 days, I have written 22 articles/blogs for her but unfortunately, I was not paid. Worst, she became inactive on skype and on the site where we both are members. What disheartened me more was that I have found some of my blogs already posted online on different sites. Coming across this blog, I now have several options as to what sites to visit and what to do as well. Thanks again. By the way, I am a stay-at-home mom too. Software offer also video creation. You can used your article as a script for video and create high quality video. By adding selected voice and own images you will get more people engaged to your website.
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